Entries Tagged 'layout' ↓

Types of kitchen – part 1


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First considerations

How will the kitchen be used and by whom. What are the clients’ particular requirements, if any. While considering these requirements, remember that the basic layout of the kitchen may last considerably longer than the present occupiers of the house and, therefore, should not be so idiosyncratic as to devalue the property. For instance, although it is common knowledge that kitchens are frequently ripped out and revamped, the general disposition of the entrance door, main window, position of sink and cooker if needing a flue, will largely condition future layouts unless substantial re-building is undertaken.

Questions to be asked

  • • How many people will the kitchen serve.
  • • Will all meals be served and eaten within, or adjoining the kitchen
  • • Or should there be a ‘breakfast bar’ in the kitchen with a more extensive dining area nearby.
  • • Is the person, who does most of the kitchen, tidy and able to work in a relatively compact area, or would they prefer a more generous layout.
  • • Do the clients have a once-a-month massive shop, and therefore require a large area of food storage, or even a separate larder.
  • • Or do they live conveniently near shops and buy food frequently, and can therefore manage with a relatively small area of food storage. Continue reading →

History of the Kitchen – 1920s and 1930s


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In the late 1920s and early 1930s, furniture manufacturers found a ready market for kitchen cabinets. These were designed to hold almost everything the cook needed, complete with flour bins, egg racks and extending tables. They also often had vented compartments as refrigerators were still uncommon.

 

From 1932–34 in the USA, General Electric and Westinghouse opened cooking institutions. Engineers, chemists, architects,  nutritionists and professional cooks studied all aspects of the kitchen. The work process was scientifically investigated, and the way was opened for the modern streamlined kitchenplanned kitchen by Hygena Continue reading →

History of the Kitchen – Appliances – part 2


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Early twentieth century

During the early part of the twentieth century up until the outbreak of World War I, kitchen design progressed very little.

Then the supply of female servants dwindled dramatically as many found work in factories, which many women preferred as it brought in more money and gave them greater independence. So, gradually, the middle classes had to start managing without so much help. New gadgets and equipment were invented and the old cast iron ranges were replaced with gas or electric cookers. In the 1930s, the well-insulated solid fuel Aga and Esse cookers were developed, and were often adopted where mains gas was not available.

First AGA cooker – patented in Sweden by the inventor Gustav Dalén in 1922. Continue reading →

Origami Kitchen


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When you think kitchen, you think base cabinets and upper cabinets, set nicely against a wall. While it’s by far the most common – and the most practical too – how else you could configure a kitchen? Well, let’s put it into the middle of a larger space.  The Origami-Mi Kitchen  incorporate three, two or one spatial dividers, all dedicated to create an area ideal for cooking.

The basis of kitchen unit is a frame made of metal tube on which are mounted boxes. The frame allows the kitchen units exist independently from the wall. For the production of fronts the manufacturer uses sandwich panels. The boxes (or drawers…) open by an electric “servo-drive”, you just lightly press the front and even a fully loaded drawer will open.

Continue reading →

History of the Kitchen – The Victorian kitchen


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The Victorians still thought it desirable to keep the kitchen, with its attendant smells, well away from the gentry end of the house. In grand homes, kitchens were positioned in the centre of the servants’ wing, surrounded by the smaller rooms of the scullery, larder and pantry with separate stores for game, fish, ice and coal. These would be adjacent to the servants’ hall with separate rooms for the cook, butler and housekeeper

The importance of the house could be judged by the number of chefs presiding over numerous kitchen maids. Kitchens were full of cooking devices such as roasting ranges, stewing and boiling stoves, turnspits and hot cupboards. However, there were no mechanised devices for washing, ventilation or refrigeration. Water was pumped by hand into scullery sinks and food was kept cool in an ice box with ice brought in from an ice house outside. Most food was still kept in north facing larders with natural ventilation.

The big change in kitchen design came about due to the social implications of the industrial revolution and the development of mechanisation Continue reading →

Blue Kitchen


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This gorgeous cottage kitchen wasn’t always this stylish and functional. With no room to cook, cramped counter space, its owners knew they needed to renovate the kitchen of their 1935 cottage in upstate New York.

So where did they start? From scratch! Since any upgrades would be a waste of money unless the quite bad layout was replanned, they began discussing the kitchen layout. The first step was to alter the floor plan in the 8×10-foot galley kitchen to add the space they needed. Continue reading →

Five things I’ve learned building a new kitchen


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Now that my kitchen is ready, it’s time to share a few things I’ve learned along the way… So, let’s see what I’ve heard from professionals as well as what are the things I’ve learned the hard way….

1. I can add that easily later, no problem.

Sure, but only if you leave space for that microwave, built-in coffee machine or whatever. Now there’s an issue: there will be a gaping void in your kitchen until you add the new piece of equipment. Sure, you can buy an extra cabinet door to cover it… But don’t forget, temporary solutions tend to become final ones – and as long as temporary things go, they are not the best. So look out.

Designers say it’s best to add features to your new kitchen during, not after, renovation (or building). Even if you’re not sure whether you’ll use a something, prepare for its future installation by running cable and electrical lines. For example, one day, you, your growing kids, or a future homeowner may want a flat-screen television or a home-monitoring screen in the kitchen. Or, you may someday need more outlets on your counters and island. Be sure to have the right cables for electricity – that new washing machine or electric oven needs beefier cables than a hand-mixer..

2. I won’t have any clutter in my new kitchen.

Yes, sure, you don’t need that extra storage, do you? I bet you do! I’m always short of storage and I bet you’re the same, except for that guy living in a warehouse. Sure, it’s not always good to have lots of stuff in a crowded pantry (and the things on the bottom of the heap won’t be used up ever) but always plan for more storage than you think you’ll need. You’ll be thankful to yourself at the end.

Sure, storage units are not the best-looking of the kitchen-furniture herd, but you need a balance between function and style. (or that warehouse…)

3. Bigger is always better.

So the bigger the better, you think. If you just got that greeeeeat big kitchen, prepare for one thing: first you’ll be tired, next you’ll be fit. Because of all that walking, that is.

My designer friend says this is a typical mistake and homeowners have to live with for a long time, since kitchen renovations are done only once every 10 years or so. The solution, some say, is to install two sets of kitchen appliances, essentially having two work triangles into the kitchen area. But you still have to walk…

4. Yes, it will fit. I need it, you know.

New flat, new kitchen. Finally, you can put all your dreams into it. All the things you’ve seen in magazines, that gorgeous island, that fine range and all bells and whistles.

Don’t try to do what’s popular without any thought to whether it would work or not in the space… As opposed to the issues of a great spaces, there are issues with smaller ones as well – you need good organisation and keep an eye on not overstuffing it.

Sorry, you cannot always have an island or that great L-shaped worktop. In smaller spaces it’s better to put in quality – in cabinets, appliances, design – you’ll especially appreciate a good designer helping you think through all aspects on how you best utilise the space you got.

5. I want that kitchen from the magazine

It’s tempting to follow the latest trends, but it’s better to be practical. Do you need that hi-gloss finish with your small kids? (how will it look like in a month’s time?) Will you still love antique cabinets in 10 years? Will that funny red-yellow kitchen featured in the magazine really work in your house?

Always try to keep things – colors, materials, moods – in sync throughout your home – it feels so much better when you arrive. Don’t get carried away and plan before you do anything – remember, changing anything later will definitely cost more.

Boat kitchens


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Ok, usually when you think kitchen, you instantly visualize something like this:detail_59

You know, it should be big enough, with an island or two, all the cupboards you need, task- accent- and food-tracing lighting, all that glitz and useful mechanics… You think great stone or walnut floor, big-big windows and ample workspace. Space to entertain, to cook, to store, whatnot.

But what happens when you have constrains? I mean real ones, not when you cannot fit in two islands, only one. Like in a ship? (no, not the QE2, you won’t be cooking there unless you’re their chef.) Let’s see:

Continue reading →

Top kitchen island ideas


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These kitchen island pictures present many different styles and ideas for islands that will help you create the perfect kitchen island for your layout. You’ll see a variety of materials used for cabinetry and countertop surfaces, including stainless, granite, marble and wood, that help tie the design with function. The many features of kitchen islands are also shown, including wine racks, storage cabinets, sinks, cooktops, eating areas and cooking areas.

Continue reading →

5 Kitchen Design Trends That Are Here to Stay


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Kitchens that are larger, open and multi-functional are here to stay according to industry experts. A generation ago, the kitchen was the room where mom cooked meals alone. Now it’s the “centre of the home,” filled with family and friends.
Instead of pricey fads like glass countertops and large-sized microwaves, look at these few kitchen design ideas that will be worth the time and money.

A quick prep area with a small sink, cutting board and microwave or a larger sink in the island helps with gourmet cooking. Mixed and matched cabinet finishes, exotic woods, jewelry-like hardware and display areas that show off glass collections give the kitchen an eclectic look. Wrap-around desks that extend into the family room provide more space. Cabinet storage for pull-down spice racks and buffet storage for beverage centers make the kitchen run more efficiently. And that’s a goal worth investing in.

Continue reading →