Entries Tagged 'hoods' ↓

Naval kitchen


Warning: Illegal string offset 'keywords_time' in /home/planakitchen/planakitchen.com/wp-content/plugins/internal_link_building.php on line 103

For sailing fanatics who can’t live without their boats, the Marecucina kitchen by Alno brings all the best maritime design to the home. The German design company decided to add a little fun to cooking time by producing a kitchen that resembles a ship.

Continue reading →

Vintage Kitchen Design


Warning: Illegal string offset 'keywords_time' in /home/planakitchen/planakitchen.com/wp-content/plugins/internal_link_building.php on line 103

I’m all for modern kitchens, but sometimes something different makes all the difference. So if you prefer something a little more vintage instead of modern, these appliances are for you.

There’s something about vintage style that can’t be defined and yet it’s there. Just take a look at these ideas from Marchi Group related to vintage kitchens.

Continue reading →

Free Up Space & Hide Your Kitchen


Warning: Illegal string offset 'keywords_time' in /home/planakitchen/planakitchen.com/wp-content/plugins/internal_link_building.php on line 103

Space is something you cannot get enough of – especially in the kitchen, where things are usually super-crammed. So here’s your challenge: fit a compact yet complete kitchen into one square meter when it’s closed up. You should keep the kitchen, and enough storage to cook and clean up easily within a very tiny limit.

Here’s how design students Kristin Laass and Norman Ebelt made it work. Their quite brilliant solution, to accommodate all the various ways that we use the kitchen was one of the entries in the DMY international design festival berlin 2010.

Continue reading →

History of the Kitchen – The Victorian kitchen


Warning: Illegal string offset 'keywords_time' in /home/planakitchen/planakitchen.com/wp-content/plugins/internal_link_building.php on line 103

The Victorians still thought it desirable to keep the kitchen, with its attendant smells, well away from the gentry end of the house. In grand homes, kitchens were positioned in the centre of the servants’ wing, surrounded by the smaller rooms of the scullery, larder and pantry with separate stores for game, fish, ice and coal. These would be adjacent to the servants’ hall with separate rooms for the cook, butler and housekeeper

The importance of the house could be judged by the number of chefs presiding over numerous kitchen maids. Kitchens were full of cooking devices such as roasting ranges, stewing and boiling stoves, turnspits and hot cupboards. However, there were no mechanised devices for washing, ventilation or refrigeration. Water was pumped by hand into scullery sinks and food was kept cool in an ice box with ice brought in from an ice house outside. Most food was still kept in north facing larders with natural ventilation.

The big change in kitchen design came about due to the social implications of the industrial revolution and the development of mechanisation Continue reading →

Isola Kitchen (s)


Warning: Illegal string offset 'keywords_time' in /home/planakitchen/planakitchen.com/wp-content/plugins/internal_link_building.php on line 103

If you’re like me, you’ll love this modern kitchen I’ve just found. It’s called Isola and comes from Italy, made by a company called LISA. Why LISA? It means: Luxury IS an Attitude. Now that’s a name! Now let’s see the kitchen:

The Isola kitchen is entirely made of steel which – besides being beautiful (if a bit difficult to keep clean off fingerprints) – makes its sleek shape possible. The Isola kitchen has a cooktop, some work-surface and a sink built in and comes with a matching hood.

Where would you put this? Surely not next to a wall, this piece of furniture (shall I say art?) is made to be on display. Also, you’ll need a quite sizeable kitchen for it to look best. It might not have the practical tidbits (like, er….. drawers?) its more boxy counterparts do, but if you have the kitchen this piece of furniture fits into, this is probably the last thing to worry about.

But wait, there’s more….. Continue reading →

A fantastic kitchen hood


Warning: Illegal string offset 'keywords_time' in /home/planakitchen/planakitchen.com/wp-content/plugins/internal_link_building.php on line 103

Are you bored with the standard, run-of-the-mill hoods you can find in every store? No designer could yet create something you _really_ like?

Here is the answer: create one for yourself! At least one homeowner in Brussels, Belgium had done so, to make her kitchen look original and appealing. This great-looking (and not really-hood-like, which is I think the best part) range hood was developed by architects Lhoas & Lhoas as part of an interior redesign.

The common but practical kitchen object was transformed into a beautiful abstract sculpture with an elegant, minimalist but still bold shape and a white finish. The design contrasts nicely with the rest of the of the kitchen furniture and manages to draw attention.

Continue reading →

Most unusual hoods


Warning: Illegal string offset 'keywords_time' in /home/planakitchen/planakitchen.com/wp-content/plugins/internal_link_building.php on line 103

I was recently in the market for a new hood. I was looking for something modern – stainless steel or glass or something like that – here’s what I’ve found.

OM

elica_om_black.jpgMy current favorite is the OM from Italian company Elica. (they are sold in the US through Zephyr as far as I know) It easily might be the most fancy hood ever made with its striking glass surface and touch-controls. It’s available in red, black and white and apparently has two types of remote controls.

The best part besides the looks is the remote control which does not have a button at all. just place the control on a flat surface – rotate clockwise to increase fan speed, counterclockwise to decrease. To control the lighting of the vent-hood, simply tap the remote control.

As for the parameters, it’s 80 cm or 31.5″ wide and tall. However quite large (for my kitchen, anyway) it atcually saves space thanks to its almost vertical placement. Airflow is 450 cubic meters per hour.

The only drawback is that it’s pretty expensive: expect to pay about $3990 in the US (about 800 pounds in the UK)

Continue reading →