Entries Tagged 'design' ↓

B2 Kitchen by Bulthaup

With the b2 kitchen workshop, 1German kitchen manufacturer bulthaup has radically rethought the concept of the kitchen. Starting from the  origins of every living space – fire and water  – the company has created an open and mobile kitchen that can be added to and composed to suit each individual’s personal requirements.

The new group of elements is the logical continuation of the kitchen workbench and defines the “kitchen workshop” in its original meaning – comprising a workbench, kitchen tool cabinet and appliance housing cabinet.

The three main elements: a ‘workbench’ housing the sink and cooker, ‘tool cabinet’ for utensils, crockery and food, and appliance cabinet for the oven, dishwasher and fridge.

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History of the Kitchen – The Victorian kitchen

The Victorians still thought it desirable to keep the kitchen, with its attendant smells, well away from the gentry end of the house. In grand homes, kitchens were positioned in the centre of the servants’ wing, surrounded by the smaller rooms of the scullery, larder and pantry with separate stores for game, fish, ice and coal. These would be adjacent to the servants’ hall with separate rooms for the cook, butler and housekeeper

The importance of the house could be judged by the number of chefs presiding over numerous kitchen maids. Kitchens were full of cooking devices such as roasting ranges, stewing and boiling stoves, turnspits and hot cupboards. However, there were no mechanised devices for washing, ventilation or refrigeration. Water was pumped by hand into scullery sinks and food was kept cool in an ice box with ice brought in from an ice house outside. Most food was still kept in north facing larders with natural ventilation.

The big change in kitchen design came about due to the social implications of the industrial revolution and the development of mechanisation Continue reading →

Starck Tower for Warendorf

As Miele kitchens rebrands itself and takes the name of the town in which the company is based – Warendorf – it is marking this change with a new kitchen. They’ve chosen one of the biggest names in design, no less than Philippe Starck to develop the first kitchen under the new brand.

Starck has created a kitchen design that represents something of a departure, both emotionally and functionally, from the traditional wall-to-wall arrangement of fitted kitchens. He calls the concept “democratic design” because its wide range of individual elements and the ability to combine them in different ways gives it potentially wide appeal to a range of consumers, lifestyles and spaces.

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History of the kitchen – Cooktops

Fuel

Timber, preferably hardwood, was burnt on the fires, while the poor used dried dung and peat. In the sixteenth century, wood became scarce and seacole came into general domestic use. It was called ‘seacole’ because it was brought to London and the east coast towns by boat from the open cast pits in Durham and Northumberland. Coal cannot be burnt directly on a hearth, so the basket grate was developed to hold the coals.

Early ovens

The first ovens were spaces made under brick or stone hearths, but they were soon moved into the return side walls of the open fireplace. These ovens, which can still be found in old cottages, were to bake bread. A fire was made inside using faggots and the door left ajar to allow the smoke to escape up the chimney over the adjacent fire. When the brick-lined oven was hot enough, the ashes were raked out and the loaves baked in the residual heat.

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History of the kitchen

Designing kitchens necessitates the integration of functional requirements, together with spaces which are pleasant to work in. Before analysing these needs it is worth looking back in time to see the antecedents of the modern kitchen. This will help to articulate and clarify the different activities needed to prepare complex meals and to realise how radically modern technology has reduced both the space and manpower needed to achieve this.

Early kitchens

The earliest kitchens, all over the world, are simply open fires, most often out of doors which is still so today in countries with a climate hot enough all the year round to make this possible.

In Britain, little is known about kitchens until Norman times. After the Romans left Britain in AD 407, the culinary arts were largely forgotten. Food was often cooked outdoors on caul- drons or spits. This was to avoid the risk of fire and to keep smells out of the houses. Continue reading →

2012 Kitchen Color Trends

As kitchens more and more the central place in the home (just as it was for hundreds of years, before the television), they’re taking on more vibrant, energetic colors.

The kitchen is absolutely a key place for color,

says Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute, one of the premier color forecasters in the country. “It’s the place where people gather, so it’s apt to have some mixing and matching of colors to create high energy.”

2012 Color of the Year: Tangerine Tango

Since most appliances are basic black, white or silver, you need bursts of color on other places. “Most kitchens have minimal wall space, so it’s a good place to splash some bold color and make a statement without overpowering the room,” says designer Jamie Drake, author of New American Glamour, whose clients include Madonna and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

We’re seeing bolder colors that complement stainless steel, as well as the darker cabinet colors that are in style,

explains Becky Ralich Spak, senior designer at Sherwin Williams. “Aztec clay colors — such as copper, henna and ginger — as well as gold tones, are popular options.” Continue reading →

Kitchen Trends in 2012

As the new approaches, I have put together a list of a few kitchen remodeling trends that are in store for 2012. Let’s see the design, appliances, colors and lighting I think will be popular next year!

Design – A recent survey done by the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) has shown that what clients really are looking for is “a multi-functional space, which reflects their individual style. One component of this trend is the integration and concealment of appliances, which opens the kitchen floor plan, embracing adjoining areas of the home, rather than becoming an intrusion into them. The economy continues to encourage homeowners to consider products and designs that are affordable and deliver long-term value.” Continue reading →

34 Well-designed Kitchens

Here are more than just a few (more than 30, to be exact) kitchen designs – very different in style and size, but all are gorgeous and well-designed. All of them are deservedly the heart of these homes.

Probably your kitchen is far from many of the ones here (mine is, for sure!), but you can get plenty of inspiration from these photos. I’ve grouped them into 4: The Rustics show you the perfect countryside kitchen. The Farm kitchens have less bling, they are more sane but nonetheless lovely. Traditionally Elegant is just that: timeless elegance, subtlety and lots of great details. Finally, the Modernos: sleek, clean lines and glossy surfaces for you modern-lovers.

 

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Popular Kitchen Lighting Questions – the most common errors

So from today, I start a new series on kitchen planning topics: let’s collect the knowledge, pepper it with a few ideas. Here are the things you should consider – first, when planning your kitchen lighting.

What are the most common kitchen lighting errors made when planning the lighting?

  1. The most common lighting error is trying to light all your kitchen with one hanging lamp in the middle of your room. Not only does the single light  become a source of glare any time you look into the kitchen (from the dark to the light.. you planned to use a biiig light, yep?). You also won’t get the needed light on your countertops. Every time you try doing any work you are working in your own shadow. Continue reading →

Blue Kitchen

This gorgeous cottage kitchen wasn’t always this stylish and functional. With no room to cook, cramped counter space, its owners knew they needed to renovate the kitchen of their 1935 cottage in upstate New York.

So where did they start? From scratch! Since any upgrades would be a waste of money unless the quite bad layout was replanned, they began discussing the kitchen layout. The first step was to alter the floor plan in the 8×10-foot galley kitchen to add the space they needed. Continue reading →